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What You Need to Know
About Parsnips

adding-carrots-and-parsnips-to-pan

A hearty root vegetable with a subtle sweet flavor and little bite, parsnips have the shape and texture of a carrot – just without the vibrant orange hue!

Parsnips have a slightly spicy flavor when eaten raw and are crisp and tasty when paired with a creamy dip. Roast them in a hot oven with fresh herbs and olive oil to bring out the sweetness. Or substitute them for potatoes to make silky mashed parsnips with cream and butter.

Interesting fact: Parsnips are sweetest after a frost.

For the best flavor, look for parsnips that have firm, dry roots. Larger parsnips can be a little woody and dense, so look for the smaller roots when selecting your produce.

TIP: If you do get large parsnips, you can quickly improve the texture by carefully cutting out the woody core.

These creamy white vegetables boast 3 grams of fiber per ½ cup when cooked, with only 55 calories and a healthy dose of vitamin C, folate, potassium and manganese.

In place of starchy, deep-fried potato fries, try tossing sliced parsnips and carrots in a few tablespoons of olive oil.  Sprinkle with paprika and a dash of Kosher salt. Bake at 375° F on a sheet pan for about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are crisp and browned.

- Alivia Duran

@aliviaduran

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